Benjamin Van Durme


2022

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Adapting Coreference Resolution Models through Active Learning
Michelle Yuan | Patrick Xia | Chandler May | Benjamin Van Durme | Jordan Boyd-Graber
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Neural coreference resolution models trained on one dataset may not transfer to new low resource domains Active learning mitigates this problem by sampling a small subset of data for annotators to label While active learning is well defined for classification tasks its application to coreference resolution is neither well defined nor fully understood This paper explores how to actively label coreference examining sources of model uncertainty and document reading costs We compare uncertainty sampling strategies and their advantages through thorough error analysis In both synthetic and human experiments labeling spans within the same document is more effective than annotating spans across documents The findings contribute to a more realistic development of coreference resolution models

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Addressing Resource and Privacy Constraints in Semantic Parsing Through Data Augmentation
Kevin Yang | Olivia Deng | Charles Chen | Richard Shin | Subhro Roy | Benjamin Van Durme
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL 2022

We introduce a novel setup for low resource task oriented semantic parsing which incorporates several constraints that may arise in real world scenarios lack of similar datasets models from a related domain inability to sample useful logical forms directly from a grammar and privacy requirements for unlabeled natural utterances Our goal is to improve a low resource semantic parser using utterances collected through user interactions In this highly challenging but realistic setting we investigate data augmentation approaches involving generating a set of structured canonical utterances corresponding to logical forms before simulating corresponding natural language and filtering the resulting pairs We find that such approaches are effective despite our restrictive setup in a low resource setting on the complex SMCalFlow calendaring dataset Andreas et al we observe relative improvement over a non data augmented baseline in top-1 match

2021

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LOME : Large Ontology Multilingual ExtractionLOME: Large Ontology Multilingual Extraction
Patrick Xia | Guanghui Qin | Siddharth Vashishtha | Yunmo Chen | Tongfei Chen | Chandler May | Craig Harman | Kyle Rawlins | Aaron Steven White | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 16th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: System Demonstrations

We present LOME, a system for performing multilingual information extraction. Given a text document as input, our core system identifies spans of textual entity and event mentions with a FrameNet (Baker et al., 1998) parser. It subsequently performs coreference resolution, fine-grained entity typing, and temporal relation prediction between events. By doing so, the system constructs an event and entity focused knowledge graph. We can further apply third-party modules for other types of annotation, like relation extraction. Our (multilingual) first-party modules either outperform or are competitive with the (monolingual) state-of-the-art. We achieve this through the use of multilingual encoders like XLM-R (Conneau et al., 2020) and leveraging multilingual training data. LOME is available as a Docker container on Docker Hub. In addition, a lightweight version of the system is accessible as a web demo.

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Everything Is All It Takes : A Multipronged Strategy for Zero-Shot Cross-Lingual Information Extraction
Mahsa Yarmohammadi | Shijie Wu | Marc Marone | Haoran Xu | Seth Ebner | Guanghui Qin | Yunmo Chen | Jialiang Guo | Craig Harman | Kenton Murray | Aaron Steven White | Mark Dredze | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Zero-shot cross-lingual information extraction (IE) describes the construction of an IE model for some target language, given existing annotations exclusively in some other language, typically English. While the advance of pretrained multilingual encoders suggests an easy optimism of train on English, run on any language, we find through a thorough exploration and extension of techniques that a combination of approaches, both new and old, leads to better performance than any one cross-lingual strategy in particular. We explore techniques including data projection and self-training, and how different pretrained encoders impact them. We use English-to-Arabic IE as our initial example, demonstrating strong performance in this setting for event extraction, named entity recognition, part-of-speech tagging, and dependency parsing. We then apply data projection and self-training to three tasks across eight target languages. Because no single set of techniques performs the best across all tasks, we encourage practitioners to explore various configurations of the techniques described in this work when seeking to improve on zero-shot training.

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Gradual Fine-Tuning for Low-Resource Domain Adaptation
Haoran Xu | Seth Ebner | Mahsa Yarmohammadi | Aaron Steven White | Benjamin Van Durme | Kenton Murray
Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Domain Adaptation for NLP

Fine-tuning is known to improve NLP models by adapting an initial model trained on more plentiful but less domain-salient examples to data in a target domain. Such domain adaptation is typically done using one stage of fine-tuning. We demonstrate that gradually fine-tuning in a multi-step process can yield substantial further gains and can be applied without modifying the model or learning objective.

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Human-Model Divergence in the Handling of Vagueness
Elias Stengel-Eskin | Jimena Guallar-Blasco | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 1st Workshop on Understanding Implicit and Underspecified Language

While aggregate performance metrics can generate valuable insights at a large scale, their dominance means more complex and nuanced language phenomena, such as vagueness, may be overlooked. Focusing on vague terms (e.g. sunny, cloudy, young, etc.) we inspect the behavior of visually grounded and text-only models, finding systematic divergences from human judgments even when a model’s overall performance is high. To help explain this disparity, we identify two assumptions made by the datasets and models examined and, guided by the philosophy of vagueness, isolate cases where they do not hold.

2020

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COD3S : Diverse Generation with Discrete Semantic SignaturesCOD3S: Diverse Generation with Discrete Semantic Signatures
Nathaniel Weir | João Sedoc | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

We present COD3S, a novel method for generating semantically diverse sentences using neural sequence-to-sequence (seq2seq) models. Conditioned on an input, seq2seqs typically produce semantically and syntactically homogeneous sets of sentences and thus perform poorly on one-to-many sequence generation tasks. Our two-stage approach improves output diversity by conditioning generation on locality-sensitive hash (LSH)-based semantic sentence codes whose Hamming distances highly correlate with human judgments of semantic textual similarity. Though it is generally applicable, we apply to causal generation, the task of predicting a proposition’s plausible causes or effects. We demonstrate through automatic and human evaluation that responses produced using our method exhibit improved diversity without degrading task performance.

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Which * BERT? A Survey Organizing Contextualized EncodersBERT? A Survey Organizing Contextualized Encoders
Patrick Xia | Shijie Wu | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

Pretrained contextualized text encoders are now a staple of the NLP community. We present a survey on language representation learning with the aim of consolidating a series of shared lessons learned across a variety of recent efforts. While significant advancements continue at a rapid pace, we find that enough has now been discovered, in different directions, that we can begin to organize advances according to common themes. Through this organization, we highlight important considerations when interpreting recent contributions and choosing which model to use.

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Causal Inference of Script Knowledge
Noah Weber | Rachel Rudinger | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

When does a sequence of events define an everyday scenario and how can this knowledge be induced from text? Prior works in inducing such scripts have relied on, in one form or another, measures of correlation between instances of events in a corpus. We argue from both a conceptual and practical sense that a purely correlation-based approach is insufficient, and instead propose an approach to script induction based on the causal effect between events, formally defined via interventions. Through both human and automatic evaluations, we show that the output of our method based on causal effects better matches the intuition of what a script represents.

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Incremental Neural Coreference Resolution in Constant Memory
Patrick Xia | João Sedoc | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

We investigate modeling coreference resolution under a fixed memory constraint by extending an incremental clustering algorithm to utilize contextualized encoders and neural components. Given a new sentence, our end-to-end algorithm proposes and scores each mention span against explicit entity representations created from the earlier document context (if any). These spans are then used to update the entity’s representations before being forgotten ; we only retain a fixed set of salient entities throughout the document. In this work, we successfully convert a high-performing model (Joshi et al., 2020), asymptotically reducing its memory usage to constant space with only a 0.3 % relative loss in F1 on OntoNotes 5.0.

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Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing: Tutorial Abstracts
Aline Villavicencio | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing: Tutorial Abstracts

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Universal Decompositional Semantic Parsing
Elias Stengel-Eskin | Aaron Steven White | Sheng Zhang | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

We introduce a transductive model for parsing into Universal Decompositional Semantics (UDS) representations, which jointly learns to map natural language utterances into UDS graph structures and annotate the graph with decompositional semantic attribute scores. We also introduce a strong pipeline model for parsing into the UDS graph structure, and show that our transductive parser performs comparably while additionally performing attribute prediction. By analyzing the attribute prediction errors, we find the model captures natural relationships between attribute groups.

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Uncertain Natural Language Inference
Tongfei Chen | Zhengping Jiang | Adam Poliak | Keisuke Sakaguchi | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

We introduce Uncertain Natural Language Inference (UNLI), a refinement of Natural Language Inference (NLI) that shifts away from categorical labels, targeting instead the direct prediction of subjective probability assessments. We demonstrate the feasibility of collecting annotations for UNLI by relabeling a portion of the SNLI dataset under a probabilistic scale, where items even with the same categorical label differ in how likely people judge them to be true given a premise. We describe a direct scalar regression modeling approach, and find that existing categorically-labeled NLI data can be used in pre-training. Our best models correlate well with humans, demonstrating models are capable of more subtle inferences than the categorical bin assignment employed in current NLI tasks.

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CopyNext : Explicit Span Copying and Alignment in Sequence to Sequence ModelsCopyNext: Explicit Span Copying and Alignment in Sequence to Sequence Models
Abhinav Singh | Patrick Xia | Guanghui Qin | Mahsa Yarmohammadi | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the Fourth Workshop on Structured Prediction for NLP

Copy mechanisms are employed in sequence to sequence (seq2seq) models to generate reproductions of words from the input to the output. These frameworks, operating at the lexical type level, fail to provide an explicit alignment that records where each token was copied from. Further, they require contiguous token sequences from the input (spans) to be copied individually. We present a model with an explicit token-level copy operation and extend it to copying entire spans. Our model provides hard alignments between spans in the input and output, allowing for nontraditional applications of seq2seq, like information extraction. We demonstrate the approach on Nested Named Entity Recognition, achieving near state-of-the-art accuracy with an order of magnitude increase in decoding speed.

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Temporal Reasoning in Natural Language Inference
Siddharth Vashishtha | Adam Poliak | Yash Kumar Lal | Benjamin Van Durme | Aaron Steven White
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2020

We introduce five new natural language inference (NLI) datasets focused on temporal reasoning. We recast four existing datasets annotated for event durationhow long an event lastsand event orderinghow events are temporally arrangedinto more than one million NLI examples. We use these datasets to investigate how well neural models trained on a popular NLI corpus capture these forms of temporal reasoning.

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The Universal Decompositional Semantics Dataset and Decomp Toolkit
Aaron Steven White | Elias Stengel-Eskin | Siddharth Vashishtha | Venkata Subrahmanyan Govindarajan | Dee Ann Reisinger | Tim Vieira | Keisuke Sakaguchi | Sheng Zhang | Francis Ferraro | Rachel Rudinger | Kyle Rawlins | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 12th Language Resources and Evaluation Conference

We present the Universal Decompositional Semantics (UDS) dataset (v1.0), which is bundled with the Decomp toolkit (v0.1). UDS1.0 unifies five high-quality, decompositional semantics-aligned annotation sets within a single semantic graph specificationwith graph structures defined by the predicative patterns produced by the PredPatt tool and real-valued node and edge attributes constructed using sophisticated normalization procedures. The Decomp toolkit provides a suite of Python 3 tools for querying UDS graphs using SPARQL. Both UDS1.0 and Decomp0.1 are publicly available at http://decomp.io.

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Joint Modeling of Arguments for Event Understanding
Yunmo Chen | Tongfei Chen | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the First Workshop on Computational Approaches to Discourse

We recognize the task of event argument linking in documents as similar to that of intent slot resolution in dialogue, providing a Transformer-based model that extends from a recently proposed solution to resolve references to slots. The approach allows for joint consideration of argument candidates given a detected event, which we illustrate leads to state-of-the-art performance in multi-sentence argument linking.

2019

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A Discriminative Neural Model for Cross-Lingual Word Alignment
Elias Stengel-Eskin | Tzu-ray Su | Matt Post | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing and the 9th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (EMNLP-IJCNLP)

We introduce a novel discriminative word alignment model, which we integrate into a Transformer-based machine translation model. In experiments based on a small number of labeled examples (1.7K5 K sentences) we evaluate its performance intrinsically on both English-Chinese and English-Arabic alignment, where we achieve major improvements over unsupervised baselines (1127 F1). We evaluate the model extrinsically on data projection for Chinese NER, showing that our alignments lead to higher performance when used to project NER tags from English to Chinese. Finally, we perform an ablation analysis and an annotation experiment that jointly support the utility and feasibility of future manual alignment elicitation.

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Broad-Coverage Semantic Parsing as Transduction
Sheng Zhang | Xutai Ma | Kevin Duh | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing and the 9th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (EMNLP-IJCNLP)

We unify different broad-coverage semantic parsing tasks into a transduction parsing paradigm, and propose an attention-based neural transducer that incrementally builds meaning representation via a sequence of semantic relations. By leveraging multiple attention mechanisms, the neural transducer can be effectively trained without relying on a pre-trained aligner. Experiments separately conducted on three broad-coverage semantic parsing tasks AMR, SDP and UCCA demonstrate that our attention-based neural transducer improves the state of the art on both AMR and UCCA, and is competitive with the state of the art on SDP.

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Bag-of-Words Transfer : Non-Contextual Techniques for Multi-Task Learning
Seth Ebner | Felicity Wang | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Deep Learning Approaches for Low-Resource NLP (DeepLo 2019)

Many architectures for multi-task learning (MTL) have been proposed to take advantage of transfer among tasks, often involving complex models and training procedures. In this paper, we ask if the sentence-level representations learned in previous approaches provide significant benefit beyond that provided by simply improving word-based representations. To investigate this question, we consider three techniques that ignore sequence information : a syntactically-oblivious pooling encoder, pre-trained non-contextual word embeddings, and unigram generative regularization. Compared to a state-of-the-art MTL approach to textual inference, the simple techniques we use yield similar performance on a universe of task combinations while reducing training time and model size.

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AMR Parsing as Sequence-to-Graph TransductionAMR Parsing as Sequence-to-Graph Transduction
Sheng Zhang | Xutai Ma | Kevin Duh | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

We propose an attention-based model that treats AMR parsing as sequence-to-graph transduction. Unlike most AMR parsers that rely on pre-trained aligners, external semantic resources, or data augmentation, our proposed parser is aligner-free, and it can be effectively trained with limited amounts of labeled AMR data. Our experimental results outperform all previously reported SMATCH scores, on both AMR 2.0 (76.3 % on LDC2017T10) and AMR 1.0 (70.2 % on LDC2014T12).

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Do n’t Take the Premise for Granted : Mitigating Artifacts in Natural Language Inference
Yonatan Belinkov | Adam Poliak | Stuart Shieber | Benjamin Van Durme | Alexander Rush
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Natural Language Inference (NLI) datasets often contain hypothesis-only biasesartifacts that allow models to achieve non-trivial performance without learning whether a premise entails a hypothesis. We propose two probabilistic methods to build models that are more robust to such biases and better transfer across datasets. In contrast to standard approaches to NLI, our methods predict the probability of a premise given a hypothesis and NLI label, discouraging models from ignoring the premise. We evaluate our methods on synthetic and existing NLI datasets by training on datasets containing biases and testing on datasets containing no (or different) hypothesis-only biases. Our results indicate that these methods can make NLI models more robust to dataset-specific artifacts, transferring better than a baseline architecture in 9 out of 12 NLI datasets. Additionally, we provide an extensive analysis of the interplay of our methods with known biases in NLI datasets, as well as the effects of encouraging models to ignore biases and fine-tuning on target datasets.

2018

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Collecting Diverse Natural Language Inference Problems for Sentence Representation Evaluation
Adam Poliak | Aparajita Haldar | Rachel Rudinger | J. Edward Hu | Ellie Pavlick | Aaron Steven White | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

We present a large-scale collection of diverse natural language inference (NLI) datasets that help provide insight into how well a sentence representation captures distinct types of reasoning. The collection results from recasting 13 existing datasets from 7 semantic phenomena into a common NLI structure, resulting in over half a million labeled context-hypothesis pairs in total. We refer to our collection as the DNC : Diverse Natural Language Inference Collection. The DNC is available online at, and will grow over time as additional resources are recast and added from novel sources.https://www.decomp.net, and will grow over time as additional resources are recast and added from novel sources.

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Halo : Learning Semantics-Aware Representations for Cross-Lingual Information ExtractionHalo: Learning Semantics-Aware Representations for Cross-Lingual Information Extraction
Hongyuan Mei | Sheng Zhang | Kevin Duh | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the Seventh Joint Conference on Lexical and Computational Semantics

Cross-lingual information extraction (CLIE) is an important and challenging task, especially in low resource scenarios. To tackle this challenge, we propose a training method, called Halo, which enforces the local region of each hidden state of a neural model to only generate target tokens with the same semantic structure tag. This simple but powerful technique enables a neural model to learn semantics-aware representations that are robust to noise, without introducing any extra parameter, thus yielding better generalization in both high and low resource settings.Halo, which enforces the local region of each hidden state of a neural model\n to only generate target tokens with the same semantic structure tag. This\n simple but powerful technique enables a neural model to learn\n semantics-aware representations that are robust to noise, without\n introducing any extra parameter, thus yielding better generalization in\n both high and low resource settings.\n

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Hypothesis Only Baselines in Natural Language Inference
Adam Poliak | Jason Naradowsky | Aparajita Haldar | Rachel Rudinger | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the Seventh Joint Conference on Lexical and Computational Semantics

We propose a hypothesis only baseline for diagnosing Natural Language Inference (NLI). Especially when an NLI dataset assumes inference is occurring based purely on the relationship between a context and a hypothesis, it follows that assessing entailment relations while ignoring the provided context is a degenerate solution. Yet, through experiments on 10 distinct NLI datasets, we find that this approach, which we refer to as a hypothesis-only model, is able to significantly outperform a majority-class baseline across a number of NLI datasets. Our analysis suggests that statistical irregularities may allow a model to perform NLI in some datasets beyond what should be achievable without access to the context.

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Collecting Diverse Natural Language Inference Problems for Sentence Representation Evaluation
Adam Poliak | Aparajita Haldar | Rachel Rudinger | J. Edward Hu | Ellie Pavlick | Aaron Steven White | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 2018 EMNLP Workshop BlackboxNLP: Analyzing and Interpreting Neural Networks for NLP

We present a large scale collection of diverse natural language inference (NLI) datasets that help provide insight into how well a sentence representation encoded by a neural network captures distinct types of reasoning. The collection results from recasting 13 existing datasets from 7 semantic phenomena into a common NLI structure, resulting in over half a million labeled context-hypothesis pairs in total. Our collection of diverse datasets is available at, and will grow over time as additional resources are recast and added from novel sources.http://www.decomp.net/, and will grow over time as additional resources are recast and added from novel sources.

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Neural Models of Factuality
Rachel Rudinger | Aaron Steven White | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, Volume 1 (Long Papers)

We present two neural models for event factuality prediction, which yield significant performance gains over previous models on three event factuality datasets : FactBank, UW, and MEANTIME. We also present a substantial expansion of the It Happened portion of the Universal Decompositional Semantics dataset, yielding the largest event factuality dataset to date. We report model results on this extended factuality dataset as well.

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On the Evaluation of Semantic Phenomena in Neural Machine Translation Using Natural Language Inference
Adam Poliak | Yonatan Belinkov | James Glass | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, Volume 2 (Short Papers)

We propose a process for investigating the extent to which sentence representations arising from neural machine translation (NMT) systems encode distinct semantic phenomena. We use these representations as features to train a natural language inference (NLI) classifier based on datasets recast from existing semantic annotations. In applying this process to a representative NMT system, we find its encoder appears most suited to supporting inferences at the syntax-semantics interface, as compared to anaphora resolution requiring world knowledge. We conclude with a discussion on the merits and potential deficiencies of the existing process, and how it may be improved and extended as a broader framework for evaluating semantic coverage

2017

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Selective Decoding for Cross-lingual Open Information Extraction
Sheng Zhang | Kevin Duh | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the Eighth International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Cross-lingual open information extraction is the task of distilling facts from the source language into representations in the target language. We propose a novel encoder-decoder model for this problem. It employs a novel selective decoding mechanism, which explicitly models the sequence labeling process as well as the sequence generation process on the decoder side. Compared to a standard encoder-decoder model, selective decoding significantly increases the performance on a Chinese-English cross-lingual open IE dataset by 3.87-4.49 BLEU and 1.91-5.92 F1. We also extend our approach to low-resource scenarios, and gain promising improvement.

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Inference is Everything : Recasting Semantic Resources into a Unified Evaluation Framework
Aaron Steven White | Pushpendre Rastogi | Kevin Duh | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the Eighth International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

We propose to unify a variety of existing semantic classification tasks, such as semantic role labeling, anaphora resolution, and paraphrase detection, under the heading of Recognizing Textual Entailment (RTE). We present a general strategy to automatically generate one or more sentential hypotheses based on an input sentence and pre-existing manual semantic annotations. The resulting suite of datasets enables us to probe a statistical RTE model’s performance on different aspects of semantics. We demonstrate the value of this approach by investigating the behavior of a popular neural network RTE model.

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Grammatical Error Correction with Neural Reinforcement Learning
Keisuke Sakaguchi | Matt Post | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the Eighth International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 2: Short Papers)

We propose a neural encoder-decoder model with reinforcement learning (NRL) for grammatical error correction (GEC). Unlike conventional maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), the model directly optimizes towards an objective that considers a sentence-level, task-specific evaluation metric, avoiding the exposure bias issue in MLE. We demonstrate that NRL outperforms MLE both in human and automated evaluation metrics, achieving the state-of-the-art on a fluency-oriented GEC corpus.

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Bayesian Modeling of Lexical Resources for Low-Resource SettingsBayesian Modeling of Lexical Resources for Low-Resource Settings
Nicholas Andrews | Mark Dredze | Benjamin Van Durme | Jason Eisner
Proceedings of the 55th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Lexical resources such as dictionaries and gazetteers are often used as auxiliary data for tasks such as part-of-speech induction and named-entity recognition. However, discriminative training with lexical features requires annotated data to reliably estimate the lexical feature weights and may result in overfitting the lexical features at the expense of features which generalize better. In this paper, we investigate a more robust approach : we stipulate that the lexicon is the result of an assumed generative process. Practically, this means that we may treat the lexical resources as observations under the proposed generative model. The lexical resources provide training data for the generative model without requiring separate data to estimate lexical feature weights. We evaluate the proposed approach in two settings : part-of-speech induction and low-resource named-entity recognition.

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Error-repair Dependency Parsing for Ungrammatical Texts
Keisuke Sakaguchi | Matt Post | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 55th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 2: Short Papers)

We propose a new dependency parsing scheme which jointly parses a sentence and repairs grammatical errors by extending the non-directional transition-based formalism of Goldberg and Elhadad (2010) with three additional actions : SUBSTITUTE, DELETE, INSERT. Because these actions may cause an infinite loop in derivation, we also introduce simple constraints that ensure the parser termination. We evaluate our model with respect to dependency accuracy and grammaticality improvements for ungrammatical sentences, demonstrating the robustness and applicability of our scheme.

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Pocket Knowledge Base Population
Travis Wolfe | Mark Dredze | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 55th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 2: Short Papers)

Existing Knowledge Base Population methods extract relations from a closed relational schema with limited coverage leading to sparse KBs. We propose Pocket Knowledge Base Population (PKBP), the task of dynamically constructing a KB of entities related to a query and finding the best characterization of relationships between entities. We describe novel Open Information Extraction methods which leverage the PKB to find informative trigger words. We evaluate using existing KBP shared-task data as well anew annotations collected for this work. Our methods produce high quality KB from just text with many more entities and relationships than existing KBP systems.

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Social Bias in Elicited Natural Language Inferences
Rachel Rudinger | Chandler May | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the First ACL Workshop on Ethics in Natural Language Processing

We analyze the Stanford Natural Language Inference (SNLI) corpus in an investigation of bias and stereotyping in NLP data. The SNLI human-elicitation protocol makes it prone to amplifying bias and stereotypical associations, which we demonstrate statistically (using pointwise mutual information) and with qualitative examples.

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Ordinal Common-sense Inference
Sheng Zhang | Rachel Rudinger | Kevin Duh | Benjamin Van Durme
Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics, Volume 5

Humans have the capacity to draw common-sense inferences from natural language : various things that are likely but not certain to hold based on established discourse, and are rarely stated explicitly. We propose an evaluation of automated common-sense inference based on an extension of recognizing textual entailment : predicting ordinal human responses on the subjective likelihood of an inference holding in a given context. We describe a framework for extracting common-sense knowledge from corpora, which is then used to construct a dataset for this ordinal entailment task. We train a neural sequence-to-sequence model on this dataset, which we use to score and generate possible inferences. Further, we annotate subsets of previously established datasets via our ordinal annotation protocol in order to then analyze the distinctions between these and what we have constructed.

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Frame-Based Continuous Lexical Semantics through Exponential Family Tensor Factorization and Semantic Proto-Roles
Francis Ferraro | Adam Poliak | Ryan Cotterell | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 6th Joint Conference on Lexical and Computational Semantics (*SEM 2017)

We study how different frame annotations complement one another when learning continuous lexical semantics. We learn the representations from a tensorized skip-gram model that consistently encodes syntactic-semantic content better, with multiple 10 % gains over baselines.

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Semantic Role Labeling
Diego Marcheggiani | Michael Roth | Ivan Titov | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing: Tutorial Abstracts

This tutorial describes semantic role labelling (SRL), the task of mapping text to shallow semantic representations of eventualities and their participants. The tutorial introduces the SRL task and discusses recent research directions related to the task. The audience of this tutorial will learn about the linguistic background and motivation for semantic roles, and also about a range of computational models for this task, from early approaches to the current state-of-the-art. We will further discuss recently proposed variations to the traditional SRL task, including topics such as semantic proto-role labeling. We also cover techniques for reducing required annotation effort, such as methods exploiting unlabeled corpora (semi-supervised and unsupervised techniques), model adaptation across languages and domains, and methods for crowdsourcing semantic role annotation (e.g., question-answer driven SRL). Methods based on different machine learning paradigms, including neural networks, generative Bayesian models, graph-based algorithms and bootstrapping style techniques. Beyond sentence-level SRL, we discuss work that involves semantic roles in discourse. In particular, we cover data sets and models related to the task of identifying implicit roles and linking them to discourse antecedents. We introduce different approaches to this task from the literature, including models based on coreference resolution, centering, and selectional preferences. We also review how new insights gained through them can be useful for the traditional SRL task.

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MT / IE : Cross-lingual Open Information Extraction with Neural Sequence-to-Sequence ModelsMT/IE: Cross-lingual Open Information Extraction with Neural Sequence-to-Sequence Models
Sheng Zhang | Kevin Duh | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 15th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Volume 2, Short Papers

Cross-lingual information extraction is the task of distilling facts from foreign language (e.g. Chinese text) into representations in another language that is preferred by the user (e.g. English tuples). Conventional pipeline solutions decompose the task as machine translation followed by information extraction (or vice versa). We propose a joint solution with a neural sequence model, and show that it outperforms the pipeline in a cross-lingual open information extraction setting by 1-4 BLEU and 0.5-0.8 F1.

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The Semantic Proto-Role Linking Model
Aaron Steven White | Kyle Rawlins | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 15th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Volume 2, Short Papers

We propose the semantic proto-role linking model, which jointly induces both predicate-specific semantic roles and predicate-general semantic proto-roles based on semantic proto-role property likelihood judgments. We use this model to empirically evaluate Dowty’s thematic proto-role linking theory.

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Explaining and Generalizing Skip-Gram through Exponential Family Principal Component Analysis
Ryan Cotterell | Adam Poliak | Benjamin Van Durme | Jason Eisner
Proceedings of the 15th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Volume 2, Short Papers

The popular skip-gram model induces word embeddings by exploiting the signal from word-context coocurrence. We offer a new interpretation of skip-gram based on exponential family PCA-a form of matrix factorization to generalize the skip-gram model to tensor factorization. In turn, this lets us train embeddings through richer higher-order coocurrences, e.g., triples that include positional information (to incorporate syntax) or morphological information (to share parameters across related words). We experiment on 40 languages and show our model improves upon skip-gram.

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Efficient, Compositional, Order-sensitive n-gram Embeddings
Adam Poliak | Pushpendre Rastogi | M. Patrick Martin | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 15th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Volume 2, Short Papers

We propose ECO : a new way to generate embeddings for phrases that is Efficient, Compositional, and Order-sensitive. Our method creates decompositional embeddings for words offline and combines them to create new embeddings for phrases in real time. Unlike other approaches, ECO can create embeddings for phrases not seen during training. We evaluate ECO on supervised and unsupervised tasks and demonstrate that creating phrase embeddings that are sensitive to word order can help downstream tasks.

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Discriminative Information Retrieval for Question Answering Sentence Selection
Tongfei Chen | Benjamin Van Durme
Proceedings of the 15th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Volume 2, Short Papers

We propose a framework for discriminative IR atop linguistic features, trained to improve the recall of answer candidate passage retrieval, the initial step in text-based question answering. We formalize this as an instance of linear feature-based IR, demonstrating a 34%-43 % improvement in recall for candidate triage for QA.