Dmitry Ustalov


2021

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Crowdsourcing Natural Language Data at Scale : A Hands-On Tutorial
Alexey Drutsa | Dmitry Ustalov | Valentina Fedorova | Olga Megorskaya | Daria Baidakova
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies: Tutorials

In this tutorial, we present a portion of unique industry experience in efficient natural language data annotation via crowdsourcing shared by both leading researchers and engineers from Yandex. We will make an introduction to data labeling via public crowdsourcing marketplaces and will present the key components of efficient label collection. This will be followed by a practical session, where participants address a real-world language resource production task, experiment with selecting settings for the labeling process, and launch their label collection project on one of the largest crowdsourcing marketplaces. The projects will be run on real crowds within the tutorial session and we will present useful quality control techniques and provide the attendees with an opportunity to discuss their own annotation ideas.

2020

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Proceedings of the Graph-based Methods for Natural Language Processing (TextGraphs)
Dmitry Ustalov | Swapna Somasundaran | Alexander Panchenko | Fragkiskos D. Malliaros | Ioana Hulpuș | Peter Jansen | Abhik Jana
Proceedings of the Graph-based Methods for Natural Language Processing (TextGraphs)

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Word Sense Disambiguation for 158 Languages using Word Embeddings Only
Varvara Logacheva | Denis Teslenko | Artem Shelmanov | Steffen Remus | Dmitry Ustalov | Andrey Kutuzov | Ekaterina Artemova | Chris Biemann | Simone Paolo Ponzetto | Alexander Panchenko
Proceedings of the 12th Language Resources and Evaluation Conference

Disambiguation of word senses in context is easy for humans, but is a major challenge for automatic approaches. Sophisticated supervised and knowledge-based models were developed to solve this task. However, (i) the inherent Zipfian distribution of supervised training instances for a given word and/or (ii) the quality of linguistic knowledge representations motivate the development of completely unsupervised and knowledge-free approaches to word sense disambiguation (WSD). They are particularly useful for under-resourced languages which do not have any resources for building either supervised and/or knowledge-based models. In this paper, we present a method that takes as input a standard pre-trained word embedding model and induces a fully-fledged word sense inventory, which can be used for disambiguation in context. We use this method to induce a collection of sense inventories for 158 languages on the basis of the original pre-trained fastText word embeddings by Grave et al., (2018), enabling WSD in these languages. Models and system are available online.

2019

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Proceedings of the Thirteenth Workshop on Graph-Based Methods for Natural Language Processing (TextGraphs-13)
Dmitry Ustalov | Swapna Somasundaran | Peter Jansen | Goran Glavaš | Martin Riedl | Mihai Surdeanu | Michalis Vazirgiannis
Proceedings of the Thirteenth Workshop on Graph-Based Methods for Natural Language Processing (TextGraphs-13)

2018

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Unsupervised Semantic Frame Induction using Triclustering
Dmitry Ustalov | Alexander Panchenko | Andrey Kutuzov | Chris Biemann | Simone Paolo Ponzetto
Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 2: Short Papers)

We use dependency triples automatically extracted from a Web-scale corpus to perform unsupervised semantic frame induction. We cast the frame induction problem as a triclustering problem that is a generalization of clustering for triadic data. Our replicable benchmarks demonstrate that the proposed graph-based approach, Triframes, shows state-of-the art results on this task on a FrameNet-derived dataset and performing on par with competitive methods on a verb class clustering task.

2017

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Watset : Automatic Induction of Synsets from a Graph of SynonymsWatset: Automatic Induction of Synsets from a Graph of Synonyms
Dmitry Ustalov | Alexander Panchenko | Chris Biemann
Proceedings of the 55th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

This paper presents a new graph-based approach that induces synsets using synonymy dictionaries and word embeddings. First, we build a weighted graph of synonyms extracted from commonly available resources, such as Wiktionary. Second, we apply word sense induction to deal with ambiguous words. Finally, we cluster the disambiguated version of the ambiguous input graph into synsets. Our meta-clustering approach lets us use an efficient hard clustering algorithm to perform a fuzzy clustering of the graph. Despite its simplicity, our approach shows excellent results, outperforming five competitive state-of-the-art methods in terms of F-score on three gold standard datasets for English and Russian derived from large-scale manually constructed lexical resources.

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Unsupervised, Knowledge-Free, and Interpretable Word Sense Disambiguation
Alexander Panchenko | Fide Marten | Eugen Ruppert | Stefano Faralli | Dmitry Ustalov | Simone Paolo Ponzetto | Chris Biemann
Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing: System Demonstrations

Interpretability of a predictive model is a powerful feature that gains the trust of users in the correctness of the predictions. In word sense disambiguation (WSD), knowledge-based systems tend to be much more interpretable than knowledge-free counterparts as they rely on the wealth of manually-encoded elements representing word senses, such as hypernyms, usage examples, and images. We present a WSD system that bridges the gap between these two so far disconnected groups of methods. Namely, our system, providing access to several state-of-the-art WSD models, aims to be interpretable as a knowledge-based system while it remains completely unsupervised and knowledge-free. The presented tool features a Web interface for all-word disambiguation of texts that makes the sense predictions human readable by providing interpretable word sense inventories, sense representations, and disambiguation results. We provide a public API, enabling seamless integration.

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Negative Sampling Improves Hypernymy Extraction Based on Projection Learning
Dmitry Ustalov | Nikolay Arefyev | Chris Biemann | Alexander Panchenko
Proceedings of the 15th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Volume 2, Short Papers

We present a new approach to extraction of hypernyms based on projection learning and word embeddings. In contrast to classification-based approaches, projection-based methods require no candidate hyponym-hypernym pairs. While it is natural to use both positive and negative training examples in supervised relation extraction, the impact of positive examples on hypernym prediction was not studied so far. In this paper, we show that explicit negative examples used for regularization of the model significantly improve performance compared to the state-of-the-art approach of Fu et al. (2014) on three datasets from different languages.