Stephan Oepen


2021

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Large-Scale Contextualised Language Modelling for NorwegianNorwegian
Andrey Kutuzov | Jeremy Barnes | Erik Velldal | Lilja Øvrelid | Stephan Oepen
Proceedings of the 23rd Nordic Conference on Computational Linguistics (NoDaLiDa)

We present the ongoing NorLM initiative to support the creation and use of very large contextualised language models for Norwegian (and in principle other Nordic languages), including a ready-to-use software environment, as well as an experience report for data preparation and training. This paper introduces the first large-scale monolingual language models for Norwegian, based on both the ELMo and BERT frameworks. In addition to detailing the training process, we present contrastive benchmark results on a suite of NLP tasks for Norwegian. For additional background and access to the data, models, and software, please see : http://norlm.nlpl.eu

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Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Parsing Technologies and the IWPT 2021 Shared Task on Parsing into Enhanced Universal Dependencies (IWPT 2021)
Stephan Oepen | Kenji Sagae | Reut Tsarfaty | Gosse Bouma | Djamé Seddah | Daniel Zeman
Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Parsing Technologies and the IWPT 2021 Shared Task on Parsing into Enhanced Universal Dependencies (IWPT 2021)

2020

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Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Parsing Technologies and the IWPT 2020 Shared Task on Parsing into Enhanced Universal Dependencies
Gosse Bouma | Yuji Matsumoto | Stephan Oepen | Kenji Sagae | Djamé Seddah | Weiwei Sun | Anders Søgaard | Reut Tsarfaty | Dan Zeman
Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Parsing Technologies and the IWPT 2020 Shared Task on Parsing into Enhanced Universal Dependencies

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Proceedings of the Second International Workshop on Designing Meaning Representations
Nianwen Xue | Johan Bos | William Croft | Jan Hajič | Chu-Ren Huang | Stephan Oepen | Martha Palmer | James Pustejovsky
Proceedings of the Second International Workshop on Designing Meaning Representations

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Proceedings of the CoNLL 2020 Shared Task: Cross-Framework Meaning Representation Parsing
Stephan Oepen | Omri Abend | Lasha Abzianidze | Johan Bos | Jan Hajič | Daniel Hershcovich | Bin Li | Tim O'Gorman | Nianwen Xue | Daniel Zeman
Proceedings of the CoNLL 2020 Shared Task: Cross-Framework Meaning Representation Parsing

2019

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Proceedings of the First International Workshop on Designing Meaning Representations
Nianwen Xue | William Croft | Jan Hajic | Chu-Ren Huang | Stephan Oepen | Martha Palmer | James Pustejovksy
Proceedings of the First International Workshop on Designing Meaning Representations

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Proceedings of the First NLPL Workshop on Deep Learning for Natural Language Processing
Joakim Nivre | Leon Derczynski | Filip Ginter | Bjørn Lindi | Stephan Oepen | Anders Søgaard | Jörg Tidemann
Proceedings of the First NLPL Workshop on Deep Learning for Natural Language Processing

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Proceedings of the 18th International Workshop on Treebanks and Linguistic Theories (TLT, SyntaxFest 2019)
Marie Candito | Kilian Evang | Stephan Oepen | Djamé Seddah
Proceedings of the 18th International Workshop on Treebanks and Linguistic Theories (TLT, SyntaxFest 2019)

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Graph-Based Meaning Representations : Design and Processing
Alexander Koller | Stephan Oepen | Weiwei Sun
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Tutorial Abstracts

This tutorial is on representing and processing sentence meaning in the form of labeled directed graphs. The tutorial will (a) briefly review relevant background in formal and linguistic semantics ; (b) semi-formally define a unified abstract view on different flavors of semantic graphs and associated terminology ; (c) survey common frameworks for graph-based meaning representation and available graph banks ; and (d) offer a technical overview of a representative selection of different parsing approaches.

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Proceedings of the Shared Task on Cross-Framework Meaning Representation Parsing at the 2019 Conference on Natural Language Learning
Stephan Oepen | Omri Abend | Jan Hajic | Daniel Hershcovich | Marco Kuhlmann | Tim O’Gorman | Nianwen Xue
Proceedings of the Shared Task on Cross-Framework Meaning Representation Parsing at the 2019 Conference on Natural Language Learning

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MRP 2019 : Cross-Framework Meaning Representation ParsingMRP 2019: Cross-Framework Meaning Representation Parsing
Stephan Oepen | Omri Abend | Jan Hajic | Daniel Hershcovich | Marco Kuhlmann | Tim O’Gorman | Nianwen Xue | Jayeol Chun | Milan Straka | Zdenka Uresova
Proceedings of the Shared Task on Cross-Framework Meaning Representation Parsing at the 2019 Conference on Natural Language Learning

The 2019 Shared Task at the Conference for Computational Language Learning (CoNLL) was devoted to Meaning Representation Parsing (MRP) across frameworks. Five distinct approaches to the representation of sentence meaning in the form of directed graph were represented in the training and evaluation data for the task, packaged in a uniform abstract graph representation and serialization. The task received submissions from eighteen teams, of which five do not participate in the official ranking because they arrived after the closing deadline, made use of additional training data, or involved one of the task co-organizers. All technical information regarding the task, including system submissions, official results, and links to supporting resources and software are available from the task web site at : http://mrp.nlpl.eu

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The ERG at MRP 2019 : Radically Compositional Semantic DependenciesERG at MRP 2019: Radically Compositional Semantic Dependencies
Stephan Oepen | Dan Flickinger
Proceedings of the Shared Task on Cross-Framework Meaning Representation Parsing at the 2019 Conference on Natural Language Learning

The English Resource Grammar (ERG) is a broad-coverage computational grammar of English that outputs underspecified logical-form representations of meaning in a framework dubbed English Resource Semantics (ERS). Two of the target representations in the the 2019 Shared Task on Cross-Framework Meaning Representation Parsing (MRP 2019) derive graph-based simplifications of ERS, viz. Elementary Dependency Structures (EDS) and DELPH-IN MRS Bi-Lexical Dependencies (DM). As a point of reference outside the official MRP competition, we parsed the evaluation strings using the ERG and converted the resulting meaning representations to EDS and DM. These graphs yield higher evaluation scores than the purely data-driven parsers in the actual shared task, suggesting that the general-purpose linguistic knowledge about English grammar encoded in the ERG can add value when parsing into these meaning representations.

2018

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Transfer and Multi-Task Learning for NounNoun Compound Interpretation
Murhaf Fares | Stephan Oepen | Erik Velldal
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

In this paper, we empirically evaluate the utility of transfer and multi-task learning on a challenging semantic classification task : semantic interpretation of nounnoun compounds. Through a comprehensive series of experiments and in-depth error analysis, we show that transfer learning via parameter initialization and multi-task learning via parameter sharing can help a neural classification model generalize over a highly skewed distribution of relations. Further, we demonstrate how dual annotation with two distinct sets of relations over the same set of compounds can be exploited to improve the overall accuracy of a neural classifier and its F1 scores on the less frequent, but more difficult relations.

2017

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Representation and Interchange of Linguistic Annotation. An In-Depth, Side-by-Side Comparison of Three Designs
Richard Eckart de Castilho | Nancy Ide | Emanuele Lapponi | Stephan Oepen | Keith Suderman | Erik Velldal | Marc Verhagen
Proceedings of the 11th Linguistic Annotation Workshop

For decades, most self-respecting linguistic engineering initiatives have designed and implemented custom representations for various layers of, for example, morphological, syntactic, and semantic analysis. Despite occasional efforts at harmonization or even standardization, our field today is blessed with a multitude of ways of encoding and exchanging linguistic annotations of these types, both at the levels of ‘abstract syntax’, naming choices, and of course file formats. To a large degree, it is possible to work within and across design plurality by conversion, and often there may be good reasons for divergent design reflecting differences in use. However, it is likely that some abstract commonalities across choices of representation are obscured by more superficial differences, and conversely there is no obvious procedure to tease apart what actually constitute contentful vs. mere technical divergences. In this study, we seek to conceptually align three representations for common types of morpho-syntactic analysis, pinpoint what in our view constitute contentful differences, and reflect on the underlying principles and specific requirements that led to individual choices. We expect that a more in-depth understanding of these choices across designs may led to increased harmonization, or at least to more informed design of future representations.